International Italy True/False Friday

True/False Friday: Unspoken Rules of Italian Coffee Culture

August 10, 2018

Italian espresso is famous all over the world and coffee breaks are almost considered like a sacred ritual of the Italian people. Throughout the day, you can hear the soothing sound of clinking of espresso cups and saucers as people bustle about. Just about anywhere you go you will find a ‘bar’ aka cafe or coffee shop. However, Italy has a mysterious and unspoken set of rules that are the foundation for this very unique culture of coffee drinking. Test your espresso knowledge below, and be sure to check out the comments after completion!

 

#1 Cappuccino: yes, but only in the morning.

Cappuccino: which is equal parts espresso, steamed milk and foamed milk is a breakfast thing. Cappuccino and a pastry is a typical way to start the day in Italy. Milky coffee drinks are normally consumed before 10/11 o’clock.

Author: Ali @ Sustainable Psyche

My name is Ali. I am an American living in Italy. I am passionate about delicious food that is also ethical, healthy and sustainable. I love pasta and pizza, traveling, horseback riding and exploring the vibrant city of Milan that I call home.

303 total views, 1 views today

#2 Drink the little glass of water after the coffee to rinse away the bitter taste

Nope. Many times when you order a coffee here they will accompany it with a small ‘shot glass’ of water. You are supposed to drink this BEFORE you drink your coffee in order to cleanse your palette and better appreciate the taste of the espresso.

Author: Ali @ Sustainable Psyche

My name is Ali. I am an American living in Italy. I am passionate about delicious food that is also ethical, healthy and sustainable. I love pasta and pizza, traveling, horseback riding and exploring the vibrant city of Milan that I call home.

303 total views, 1 views today

#3 ‘Caffè corretto’ is the way to order a classic espresso

Actually a caffè corretto does not translate to “correct coffee” but corrected coffee, aka a splash of alcohol like sambuca or grapa. A great after dinner drink.

When you want an espresso in Italy, you just have to order “un caffè”. It goes without saying that you are ordering an espresso. (also, don’t make the mistake of pronouncing it EX-presso)

Author: Ali @ Sustainable Psyche

My name is Ali. I am an American living in Italy. I am passionate about delicious food that is also ethical, healthy and sustainable. I love pasta and pizza, traveling, horseback riding and exploring the vibrant city of Milan that I call home.

303 total views, 1 views today

#4 You drink your coffee first and pay later

Yes, many places will serve you your coffee and won’t expect to be paid until after you are done. However in some places (airports, busy central bars, touristy areas) you may have to pay at the cash register and then take your receipt to the barista and tell them your order.

Author: Ali @ Sustainable Psyche

My name is Ali. I am an American living in Italy. I am passionate about delicious food that is also ethical, healthy and sustainable. I love pasta and pizza, traveling, horseback riding and exploring the vibrant city of Milan that I call home.

303 total views, 1 views today

#5 If you order a ‘latte’ you will receive a glass of milk.

Yes, because that’s exactly what you ordered. Some coffee drinks with milk in Italy include:

Cappuccino: equal parts espresso, steamed milk and foamed milk

Marocchino: espresso, cocoa powder and foamed milk

Caffè Latte: same as cappuccino but with more steamed milk and less foam

Latte Macchiato: steamed milk with a splash of espresso

Author: Ali @ Sustainable Psyche

My name is Ali. I am an American living in Italy. I am passionate about delicious food that is also ethical, healthy and sustainable. I love pasta and pizza, traveling, horseback riding and exploring the vibrant city of Milan that I call home.

#6 ‘Prendiamoci un caffè’ aka “Let’s get a coffee” is appropriate at any time of day

A coffee break (whether that be with breakfast, mid morning, after lunch, after dinner) is welcomed at anytime of day. It’s common for people to go get a quick coffee as a pick me up or after meals.

Going for coffee with friends or colleagues is a time to share thoughts and exchange in conversation.

Author: Ali @ Sustainable Psyche

My name is Ali. I am an American living in Italy. I am passionate about delicious food that is also ethical, healthy and sustainable. I love pasta and pizza, traveling, horseback riding and exploring the vibrant city of Milan that I call home.

#7 The Moka is commonly used to prepare coffee when at home

The Moka (stovetop espresso maker) is a staple in Italian homes. These aluminum pots create a delicious espresso in just a few minutes. It comes in different sizes and styles according to personal preference.

 

Of course there are now Nespresso macchines and  coffee capsules, but the most traditional and authentic way to drink coffee at home is by using a Moka.

Author: Ali @ Sustainable Psyche

My name is Ali. I am an American living in Italy. I am passionate about delicious food that is also ethical, healthy and sustainable. I love pasta and pizza, traveling, horseback riding and exploring the vibrant city of Milan that I call home.

#8 You won’t find Starbucks in Italy

It is blasphemous to me to even think of serving a “venti iced coffee with 5 pumps of vanilla, caramel and extra heavy cream on top.” in Italy. But the first Italian Starbucks will be opening in Milan this fall near the downtown Cathedral.

*cue ugly crying*

Author: Ali @ Sustainable Psyche

My name is Ali. I am an American living in Italy. I am passionate about delicious food that is also ethical, healthy and sustainable. I love pasta and pizza, traveling, horseback riding and exploring the vibrant city of Milan that I call home.

#9 Caffè Lungo is the same as Caffè Americano

Caffè Lungo means ‘long coffee’ but it is not the same as an americano. Lungo means it will be left just a touch longer and gives a few extra millimeters of espresso (still served in espresso cup). An Americano on the other hand is espresso diluted with lots of hot water and is served in a larger mug.

Author: Ali @ Sustainable Psyche

My name is Ali. I am an American living in Italy. I am passionate about delicious food that is also ethical, healthy and sustainable. I love pasta and pizza, traveling, horseback riding and exploring the vibrant city of Milan that I call home.

#10 A single espresso normally about costs 2€

Thankfully not. If you are paying 2€ or more for an espresso in Italy you are most likely in a touristy area. Typically an espresso is 1€ flat, but some places have now raised their prices to 1.10-1.20€.

Author: Ali @ Sustainable Psyche

My name is Ali. I am an American living in Italy. I am passionate about delicious food that is also ethical, healthy and sustainable. I love pasta and pizza, traveling, horseback riding and exploring the vibrant city of Milan that I call home.

finish

Results

Author: Ali @ Sustainable Psyche

My name is Ali. I am an American living in Italy. I am passionate about delicious food that is also ethical, healthy and sustainable. I love pasta and pizza, traveling, horseback riding and exploring the vibrant city of Milan that I call home.

925 total views, 2 views today

Author: Ali @ Sustainable Psyche

My name is Ali. I am an American living in Italy. I am passionate about delicious food that is also ethical, healthy and sustainable. I love pasta and pizza, traveling, horseback riding and exploring the vibrant city of Milan that I call home.

926 total views, 3 views today

Author: Ali @ Sustainable Psyche

My name is Ali. I am an American living in Italy. I am passionate about delicious food that is also ethical, healthy and sustainable. I love pasta and pizza, traveling, horseback riding and exploring the vibrant city of Milan that I call home.

924 total views, 1 views today

You Might Also Like

No Comments

Leave a Reply